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      Cambridge

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      Cambridge, Massachusetts is famous for its very culturally, economically and ethnically diverse population. Cambridge residents range from wealthy MIT and Harvard professors to recent immigrants to working-class families to fledgling students. With a population of over 100,000 residents, it is one of the largest cities in Massachusetts.

      Cambridge is often referred to as the "City of Squares" because many of its commercial and residential areas are major street intersections known as squares. These 'squares' (which are not always technically square) include:

      Kendall Square
      Kendall Square is formed by the junction of Broadway, Main Street, and Third Street. Just over the Longfellow Bridge from Boston, at the eastern end of the MIT campus. It is served by an MBTA Red Line station. This is where most of Cambridge's large office buildings and towers are clustered, giving it the feeling of an urban office park. Biotech is a flourishing industry in Kendall Square.

      Central Square
      Central Square is formed by the junction of Massachusetts Avenue, Prospect Street, and Western Avenue. Central Square is probably most known for it's collection of diverse, ethnic restaurants. Although recently, Central Square was somewhat less than desireable, it has undergone a controversial gentrification in recent years and continues to grow more expensive and upscale. It is served by a Red Line station. Lafayette Square, formed by the junction of Massachusetts Avenue, Columbia Street, Sidney Street, and Main Street, is considered a part of the Central Square area. Cambridgeport is south of Central Square along Magazine Street and Brookline Street.

      Harvard Square
      Harvard Square, formed by the junction of Mass. Avenue, Brattle Street, and JFK Street. This is arguably the most famous 'square' in Cambridge, and is the home of Harvard University, the oldest university in the United States and is a major Cambridge shopping area. It is served by the Harvard Square Red Line station. A short distance away from the square lies the Cambridge Common, while the neighborhood north of Harvard but east of Mass Ave is known as Agassiz in honor of the famed scientist Louis Agassiz.

      Porter Square
      Porter Square is about a mile north on Mass. Ave from Harvard Square, formed by the junction of Mass. Ave and Somerville Ave, and including part of the city of Somerville. It is served by the Porter Square station which includes a Red Line stop and a Fitchburg Line commuter rail stop in the same building.

      Inman Square
      Inman Square is located at the junction of Cambridge and Hampshire streets in Mid-Cambridge. Inman Square is considered the most funky and fun square, and home to many ethnic and diverse dining establishments, bars, boutiques, jazz clubs, coffee shops and delis.The funky street scene still holds some urban flair but was dressed up recently with Victorian street lights, benches and bus-stops. A new community park was installed and is a favorite place to enjoy some takeout food from the nearby restaurants and ice cream parlor.

      Lechmere Square
      Named for a long ago defunct retail store, Lechmere Square is located at the junction of Cambridge and First streets, adjacent to the CambridgeSide Galleria shopping mall. Perhaps best known as the eastern end of the MBTA Green Line subway.

      The residential neighborhoods in Cambridge border, but are not defined by the squares. These include:

      • East Cambridge is bordered on the north by the Somerville border, on the east by the Charles River, on the south by Broadway and Main Street, then on the west by railroad tracks.
      • MIT Campus is bordered on the north by Broadway and on the south and east by the Charles River, then on the west by railroad tracks.
      • Wellington-Harrington bordered on the north by the Somerville border and on the south and west by Hampshire Street, then on the east by railroad tracks.
      • Cambridgeport is bordered on the north by Massachusetts Avenue and on the south by the Charles River, then on the west by River Street and on the east by railroad tracks.
      • Mid Cambridge is bordered on the north by Kirkland and Hampshire Streets and the Somerville border and on the south by Massachusetts Avenue, then on the west by Peabody Street and on the east by Prospect Street.
      • Riverside is bordered on the north by Massachusetts Avenue and on the south by the Charles River, then on the west by JFK Street and on the east by River Street.
      • Agassiz is bordered on the north by the Somerville border and on the south and east by Kirkland Street, then on the west by Massachusetts Avenue.
      • Peabody/Neighborhood is bordered on the north by railroad tracks and on the south by Concord Avenue, then on the west by railroad tracks and Massachusetts Avenue. It includes the neignborhood of Avon Hill.
      • West Cambridge is bordered on the north by Concord Avenue and Garden Street and on the south by the Charles River and the Watertown border, then on the west by the east shore of Fresh Pond and the Collins Branch Library and on the east by JFK Street. It includes the neignborhoods of Brattle Street and Huron Avenue.
      • North Cambridge (Area 11) is bordered on the north by the Arlington border and partially the Somerville border and on the south by the railroad tracks, then on the west by the Belmont border and on the east by the Somerville border.
      • Cambridge Highlands is bordered on the north and east by railroad tracks and on the south by the north shore of the Fresh Pond, then on the west by the Belmont border.
      • Strawberry Hill is bordered on the north by the south shore of Fresh Pond and on the south by the Watertown border, then on the west by the Belmont border and on the east by railroad tracks.